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The Howl of Family: A Review of Wolf Children

The Howl of Family: A Review of Wolf Children

To smile through any hardship is a commendable virtue for anyone to have.  Continuing to do so while having to raise two half-human, half-wolf children is something on a different world of resilience altogether. The story of the Wolf Children Ame And Yuki is about a mother and father who fell in fairy-tale love and their pups who have to become what they truly want to be in world that won’t ... Read More »

Anime roundup 3/17/2013: Showdown time

So here’s how this works: Every week, I commentate on the latest episodes of various anime series, and then we all discuss further in the comments! Then in April, From the New World will end and a whole crop of new shows will start, of which one or two may be added to the regular commentary posts. I’ll be posting a quick preview of the more notable upcoming shows in a couple weeks. Fro... Read More »

Interview: Alan Tucker

Adam Gaffen interviews Alan Tucker upon the release of his latest book – A Knot in Time Adam Gaffen for Amazing Stories: Please share a bit about your newest release, Knot in Time, without giving away any spoilers. Alan Tucker: This book starts a new series and is science fiction, rather than the fantasy I wrote to begin with. It’s about a nineteen-year-old high school dropout who gets... Read More »

Review: Men Into Space by John C. Frederiksen

MEN INTO SPACE John C. Frederiksen Bear Manor Media 2013 314 Pages  $21.95 (Kindle $9.95) Men Into Space was a television show that (unfortunately) aired for a single season between September 1959 and September, 1960.   It was a show dedicated to treating the exploration and exploitation of space in a serious, realistic manner, serving as foreshadow of what seemed to be a not-too-distant future, p... Read More »

The Artful Collector: Collecting Strategies Part 5 “Living Dangerously”

The Artful Collector: Collecting Strategies Part 5 “Living Dangerously”

There is one strategy for collecting that I haven’t yet mentioned. It is not only potentially the most expensive, it is also the most dangerous. Buy What Everyone Else is Buying Pick any one of these (in no special chronological order): 007, the Adams Family, zombies, Nightmare Before Christmas, Beanie Babies, fairies, angels, gargoyles, vampires, more zombies . . . there are always fads, tr... Read More »

Hybrid Authors: The Best of Both Worlds

Hybrid Authors: The Best of Both Worlds

I’ve been exclusively published through a small press. I’ve been exclusively self-published. I’ve been exclusively traditionally published. But I’m about to go “hybrid” and I think it offers the best of both worlds, and, like me, many more are going the same route. For those who don’t know what a hybrid author is…it’s one that releases books bo... Read More »

Lessons from the Tolkien Boycott

How times have changed. Back in the late 60s, Ace Books found a loophole in the copyright for The Lord of the Rings that allowed them to publish an “unauthorized” (i.e. pirated) paperback edition. Since the only alternative in the U.S. was the much-more-expensive Houghton Mifflin hardback, the Ace edition sold very well. When Balantine brought out the authorized (and higher-priced) pap... Read More »

Resurrecting the Literary Dead

Resurrecting the Literary Dead

Though William Faulkner is often attributed with the expression “In writing, you must kill your darlings,” the expression first appeared in a lecture On the Art of Writing by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch as, “Whenever you fell an impulse to penetrate a piece of exceptionally fine writing, obey it – whole-heartedly – and delete it before sending your manuscripts to press. Murder your darlings.” In esse... Read More »

Nintendo 3DS XL | nintendo.com

Nintendo’s 3DS XL

We geeks love our gadgets. Can’t live without ’em. Granted, I have a dumbphone and a laptop—neither a tablet nor smartphone to boast of. That doesn’t mean I wouldn’t rather own a Galaxy S-III or MacBook Air or Microsoft Surface. But unfortunately, money is sometimes a concern. As someone who is both a young, introverted creative-type and working-class desk jockey, I like to... Read More »

Let Us Now Praise Betty and Veronica

Let Us Now Praise Betty and Veronica

I became a comics fan at six years old. Something about the medium exhilarated me–something I still have trouble articulating. Something that made me leaf reverently through my father’s old Marvel back issues, the characters frozen in stories I knew only a slice of. Something that compelled me to get my dad to drive me to the bookstore one day in 1996 so I could visit the comics spinne... Read More »

Playing the Short Game: How to Sell Your Short Fiction (Part 9 in series)

Playing the Short Game: How to Sell Your Short Fiction (Part 9 in series)

Markets, Markets Everywhere: How to select the right market Welcome back. This is my ninth post on how to market and sell short fiction. This series is written in a very specific sequence, with each post building on earlier ones. If you haven’t already, you can read my earlier posts here. In part 7, I explained why you should “start at the top” when deciding where to first send a... Read More »

Cyberstorm: Pack Up Your Water Bottles

Cyberstorm: Pack Up Your Water Bottles

Matthew Mather’s new book, Cyberstorm, is a must read for people who understand the world of cyber technology and its vulnerability but unlike many other books on the topic it is the equally enthralling for those, like me, who have little or no background in the area.  Mather’s best-selling Atopia Chronicles are now joined by a book which is destined to hit the best-seller list as well. The main c... Read More »

A Lesson in Suspense

A Lesson in Suspense

One of the great things about science fiction and fantasy is that it takes us to new worlds and gives us new perspectives on things that we never had before. With science fiction that can also include time travel — traveling into the past and getting new insights and new perspectives on things events or ideas that we didn’t have before. It allows us to see familiar objects in a new lig... Read More »

The Launch Pad Astronomy Workshop for Writers

I have some news about the workshop, but first, in case you don’t know what it is… Launch Pad is a week-long workshop held every summer since 2007 at the University of Wyoming.  I founded the workshop in order to get the most out of my love for both science and science fiction, to teach writers to get more and better quality astronomy in their work and in turn educate and inspire the p... Read More »

Of Blacklists and Freedoms: DC, Superman and Orson Scott Card

DC Comics recently announced that they had put a Superman title that was to be authored by Orson Scott Card in abeyance; the artist – Chris Sprouse – having decided to remove himself from the project;  Chris said “It took a lot of thought to come to this conclusion, but I’ve decided to step back as the artist on this story. The media surrounding this story reached the point where it to... Read More »

Flash Fiction

We are inundated by fiction. Every trip to the few remaining bookshops has more and more books marching along the shelves, magically procreating like the enchanted brooms in Disney’s Fantasia. There are so many books and so little time, especially when most of our reading now takes place online, in reading web articles and ever-shorter Facebook posts. For a new author, it is very difficult to get ... Read More »

BLUE PENCILS AND BLOODY SWORDS: EDITORS OF S&S

It’s easy to discuss authors for their contributions are evident. You just have to read the stories. The great editors are harder to corral, for the editor’s job is one of selection, guidance, subjective acts that may be hard to understand in hindsight. (For instance, all those men and women who rejected Dune by Frank Herbert, a Science Fiction series that broke best-selling records fo... Read More »

ASM Blog Horde Interview with Diane Severson

Welcome to the Amazing Stories BLOG HORDE INTERVIEWS! The ASM Blog Horde is a diverse and wonderful species. I have the privilege of talking with all of them, and I get to share those chats with you. In this long-running series, you will have the opportunity to peek inside the minds of the ASM bloggers to to see just what makes them tick. I hope you enjoy the series as much as I have enjoyed prepa... Read More »

Interview with Bruce Boston – Part 1

Interview with Bruce Boston – Part 1

Bruce Boston. Among speculative poets and those who read it, he’s a well-known name. But just in case YOU are not familiar with him, here’s a brief biography of the Man (gleaned from his own website): Since this is an interview I’ll let him speak for himself – Tell us a little about yourself, your history. I was born of Catholic and Jewish heritage in Chicago in 1943, and grew up in Southern Calif... Read More »

From the In Box

Irish Wake for Jan Howard Finder. Legendary fan Jan Howard Finder passed away recently from complications from cancer and chemo therapy.  His friends and fellow fans are honoring his request that they hold an Irish Wake in his honor. Details can be found on the Facebook Page. From Facebook: For jan, for us, we get together in “Irish Wake” at his request, to share stories, laughs, tears... Read More »

Defending Quality Over Popularity

It is to my ever increasing frustration that I continually see true literary talent dismissed as ‘too complex’ or ‘deep’ in favour of the mildly-talented easy-way-out authors who have become ‘popular’ in a day and age where mediocrity seems to be paramount. Pratchett vs. Rowling During the middle of the last decade – when I was knee deep in the world of Harry Potter, Harry Potter fan-f... Read More »

MONSTER EARTH- A Book Review

I grew up watching kaiju. Well, back then I didn’t know that’s what it was called. I just thought it was cool watching giant monsters duke it out at the peril of many a balsawood building. For me, my first kaiju was Ultraman. Later, I discovered the Godzilla movies. Good times. When I first heard about Monster EarthI was hooked. An alternate history collection of stories where WWII was won with mo... Read More »

Woman, You Make Me Sick and Other Adventures in Freefall

Woman, You Make Me Sick and Other Adventures in Freefall

These offputting objects killed the novel. Let's dance. 'Cos it's more fun reading in freefall. Read More »

Unforgiven

Crossroads: The Western Hero in Speculative Fiction

Someone once said that every story starts with someone either coming to town, or leaving town. And there is no genre for which this adage holds more true than the western. It probably takes us all of a second and a half to recognize the western hero, whether he’s wearing the stereotypical white hat or not. The Universal Makeup of the Western Hero He (and it is almost always a man)… is ... Read More »

From the In Box

ATOMIC BARK! explores all types of Science Fiction, Horror, Fantasy, Surrealism, and alternative/subversive culture, in all media, including literature, cinema, art, comic books, music, theatre, philosophy and science, and much more. The ATOMIC BARK! Radio Show continues every WEDNESDAY evening, from 9 to 10pm (GMT) with repeats every Friday at 11am (GMT) It’s on the radio dial on 104.4 FM i... Read More »

Synthetic Voices #15 – February 2013 Top Picks

Synthetic Voices #15 – February 2013 Top Picks

Woweewow, I love February’s crop of Top Picks!  There is so much goodness I can hardly contain myself!  I think all tastes will be sated this month. [powerpress] Discuss on: Read More »

The Myth of Science

Welcome internet traveler. I will be stockpiling neatly organized bits into a collective known as a blog along this portion of your journey. Do not fear for your personal safety, as I will take great care to observe the rules of hospitality during your visit.  As I am a certifiable Tech Geek, I will spend a portion of my efforts exploring the connection between science and technology and science f... Read More »

The British Are Coming…Again

I’ve always thought that US TV shows have the ground covered when it comes to science fiction TV shows (although the UK has the longest running show Doctor Who to brag about). But occasionally the UK produces some great new content. Being Human is one show, which was picked up and spun into a US version, although I decided to stop watching after Aiden Turner left the show to go and film the ... Read More »

The Martian Chronicles and Other Metaphors

They came because they were afraid or unafraid, happy or unhappy. There was a reason for each man. They were coming to find something or get something, or to dig up something or bury something. They were coming with small dreams or big dreams or none at all —Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles When I was but a sprite, and before I became an avid reader of books (I preferred comic books), I read R... Read More »

Mangling the works of Jules Verne

In a recent post about Jules Verne and his translators for English editions, I included a few examples of how those translators mangled Verne’s stories, so that for generations his authorial abilities were maligned by English-reading critics, and he was considered a writer only fit for youthful readers–and barely fit, at that. In that essay, I didn’t want to include too many detailed example... Read More »

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